Blog Archives

Naa Ke Naa Cards

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Coming soon!

GaDangme Greeting cards designed by Naa Obiele and Naa Adjeley Founders of the GaDangme Roots and Heritage Foundation to help fund the work of the GDRHF.

By creating our greeting card range, we aim to raise money for the GDRHF and to promote both the language and culture of our people.
We will be opening our Etsy store very soon, so please do come back for regualr updates. If you would like to pre order any designs listed on our page please email us at gadangmerootsandheritage@gmail.com

Oyiwaladonn
Naa Obiele and Naa Adjeley.
Founders of GDRHF

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The more I learn about my people the more proud it makes me feel to be part of a small but significant African tribe rich in history, culture and traditions

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My name is Nii Anyetei. I am referred to with a combination of my first and middle names and initials Seth, Setto, SA, Gbontwi, GA, Nii-Nii and just simply Anyetei I wasn’t born in the UK but I was raised here (Hackney, north east London to exact) by my parents, both Ga and both from La, Accra.

I seem to meet and know a lot of Ga people these days but growing up I only knew few couple Ga families so I felt like we were a minority(amongst Ghanaians) within a minority (amongst Africans in London). In addition to my parents I was raised by my maternal great-grandmother who spoke and understood no English so my siblings and I had to speak and understand Ga. Furthermore she (Atei we called her) liked her Ga bible read to her so I learned how to read then write Ga a little. Still with that I would rate my proficiency with Ga at only 60% so I have plenty to improve and plan to get myself to 100% by associating with groups like GDRHF and time spent in Ghana.

Meanwhile as an African history aficionado I seek out books on Ga history, Ga music and there’s even a few Ga poems out there too which all help. The more I learn about my people the more proud it makes to me feel to be part of a small but significant African tribe rich in history, culture and traditions.

“In Granddad’s words Ga’s are superior! #ThatIsAll.”

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My name is Chezella Kukueley Mac
(I love both names despite them being mispronounced by most people even family members still have trouble!)

I’m half Ga, and half Jamaican.
And I live in Souf London.

Growing up has been good, weird for some people that:
1. My Dad does have a Jamaican accent as Patois (Patwa)
2. My Mum DOESN’T have a Ghanaian accent (as she was raised in the UK from the age of 7yrs)

My Grandparents are my biggest influencers of our Ga culture (in Granddad’s words Ga’s are superior! #ThatIsAll. BB face, with hand across the eyes) in terms of traditions and history, but for some strange reason I was never taught how to speak Ga. Our (my sister and I) efforts seems to be learning rhyming cockney slang (I was brought up in Stepney Green, not far from where the Kray twins were). My mother speaks Ga, as do the rest of the family members and my sis and I just stand there like Emmanuel from Forty Towers.

I didn’t think anything of it then but NOW I find it the BIGGEST hindrance to a complete holistic learning of my Ga history and as an African who is learning about my Nubian history. I sometimes get my younger cousins to translate for me (if they are nearby)
But God willing, and by force I will learn!

Although I don’t speak Ga, I love all aspects of Ga traditions, naming ceremonies, engagements etc and the food. I stand as a very proud African (as I am of mixed heritage), so much so that my sis and I developed http://www.lovelynotebooks.co.uk
which shows our appreciation to African influences of rich colours and styles.

Kukueley

Lovely Notebooks
http://www.lovelynotebooks.co.uk
Lovely Notebooks is the new and exclusive luxury range of paper notebooks which have been designed and handcrafted

Nicola Tele Steele – “The Adopted Ga!”

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Hey, this is Nicola Steele and I was born and raised in East London to West Indian parents.

When considering a middle name for me, my Dad confided in a close Ghanaian friend who suggested ‘Tele’, meaning first born female in Ga. So it only seemed right that my first visit to the African continent should start with Ghana! In December 2010, I travelled with three friends and spent two weeks enjoying Accra’s offering of good food, beaches, night life, cultural enrichment and of course, the glorious sunshine, which was a stark contrast to the snowy London we’d departed from.

As an ‘adopted Ga’, I’m really looking forward to returning to Ghana, hopefully exploring outside the capital a bit more and already have some Cedis put aside for my next trip – can’t wait!

Nicola Tele Steele.

Mo Hee, Awa Awa Atuu!

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GaDangme Roots and Heritage Foundation and I Am GaDangme?

Some of you reading this may be asking yourselves, Who or what are they?  Some maybe able to guess just from our name. However I am sure most have you have guessed correctly, so clap for yourself! Yay!

So who are GaDangme Roots and Heritage Foundation and I Am GaDangme?

Well just in case you have not yet guessed we are the same group, I suppose I Am GaDangme could be seen as our Sabla (nickname).

The GaDangme Roots and Heritage Foundation was founded on the 24th of February 2012 by Naa Obiele Laryea and Chochoe Quaye.

Our aim is to bring GaDangme’s born in the Diaspora together, to preserve our Culture and Identity. Now we are not trying to win brownie points here, no not at all. However as we have grown into young women and travelled to and from Ghana. We have had the chance to explore not only the land, but also our rich and beautiful culture independently. Which has driven us to make others like ourselves more aware and proud of who they are.

GaDangme and Proud

Many of us have taken our culture for granted or not had the opportunity to embrace it as we should. Therefore we  have not had the opportunity to learn how to speak our languages, history or even how to cook our own foods. Not to mention our names and the naming system.  If we as the next generation have not embraced these things, what hope is there for our children?

Researching GaDangme’s

Have you ever tried to search in books or online for anything GaDangme? If you have answered yes! Then you will know that it is very hard to find information on our culture in fact practically impossible. For those of us who are lucky enough to have come across informative material, unfortunately it is either very hard to understand without input or explanation from our elders, or the webpage is no longer in existence!

We at GaDangme Roots and Heritage believe that as young people it is important for us to have our own space, our own environment in which we can grow and learn from one another. Our aim is to constantly try and bring to you constructive and informative material and literature. As we want to encourage you to discover who you are without feeling embarrassed for mispronouncing a word, to create an environment in which  no one will judge you for asking a questions that you may feel are ‘silly’ Somewhere where you can Learn, Laugh and be free.

So how do we do this?

Well the GDHRF hold Events, Cultural and Language Classes, Outings and produce short video’s on various aspects of our culture and histories.  By doing so we want to create as we mentioned earlier a space for us all to enjoy.

So GaDangme’s get ready to laugh about our GaDangme’ness (new word) and we promise, it won’t start with Ma Yi Bo eh or Mark it on the wall…!

Everyone has a right to be proud of whom they are…so say it out loud and say it Proud I AM GADANGME!

Follow us on Facebook @ http://www.facebook.com/GaDangmeRootsandHeritageFoundation

Or Contact us at GaDangmeRootsandHeritage@gmail.com