My Name is Naa Adjeley Gborjor Tsotsoo Adjei Kwei!

Born and Raised in London, now Living in Bristol.

I currently work for Bristol City Council; I am CEO of Afrinique Limited, Presenter, and Producer of the Bristol 2020 show and the CoFounder of GaDangme Roots and Heritage Foundation.

I started learning to speak Ga (not just the insults) when I was 18. I still dont speak as well as I should do as people laughing at the way I spoke the Ga hindered me for a while, but now im going for it!  

The first Things I learnt in Ga were Ma Yi Bo Ehhh ( Ill beat you ehhhh) and Femo dinn (Keep Quiet). Please note that the fact I can insult like a Ga born and raised in Ghana (no English accent in sight) is not a reflection of the words commonly used in my upbringing ;-).

Naa Adjeley Kwei!

Allow me to re introduce myself, My name is Hov… Okay I won’t go there!

Naa Obiele Laryea however my name is abbreviated and change to a number things from Obi Obie (which I hate) Ob Obs Obi wan Kenobi Ob trice. Oh dear the list goes on…

I am the CoFounder of The GaDangme Roots and Heritage Foundation and Sweet chocolate cakes (http://www.facebook.com/SweetChocolateCakes). The GDRHF project is my little baby and watching it grow is so exciting!

I was born in the early 80s in Aberdeen Scotland and moved to London when I was five years of age.  Language has always played an important part in my life.  I believe my gift for languages exists because my parents spoke Ga at home although not to me so I have always understood the language., however I spent a lot of time with my nana Barbara who was more of a au pair than a babysitter  so I never really spoke the Ga. Once I moved to London, my first few years were spent trying to sound like those around me, as no one at school could understand me!

Now I believe this is why for years I have been happy to understand Ga and not speak it. The trauma experienced during my childhood, always came flooding back when family members would laugh at my attempts. I simply shrugged it off and thought, Ah I do not need it anyway!

That was until I started to visit Ghana alone, the power of knowing the language became real!  For example I  would go out and everyone would speak to me and Ga and I would reply in English! Mmm.. it was fine for a while but frustrating after no too long after. So now, I have decided enough is enough and I am going to actively start speaking  Ga at any given opportunity.

However, I must admit when people push me into a corner and demand I speak I refuse to.  I cannot deal with being dictated to especially since it always seems to happen when I’m in a crowd. Why people insist on doing this I will never know. But hey that my personal battle I need to get over haha.. One step at a time ay?! But I won’t allow that  hinder my progress, nope not me daabi I will practise from now onwards until I am perfect with my estuary accent and all!! Hahaha..!

Naa Obiele Laryea : )

Hey, this is Nicola Steele and I was born and raised in East London to West Indian parents.

When considering a middle name for me, my Dad confided in a close Ghanaian friend who suggested ‘Tele’, meaning first born female in Ga. So it only seemed right that my first visit to the African continent should start with Ghana! In December 2010, I travelled with three friends and spent two weeks enjoying Accra’s offering of good food, beaches, night life, cultural enrichment and of course, the glorious sunshine, which was a stark contrast to the snowy London we’d departed from.

As an ‘adopted Ga’, I’m really looking forward to returning to Ghana, hopefully exploring outside the capital a bit more and already have some Cedis put aside for my next trip – can’t wait!

Nicola Tele Steele.

My name is Chezella Kukueley Mac
(I love both names despite them being mispronounced by most people even family members still have trouble!)

I’m half Ga, and half Jamaican.
And I live in Souf London.

Growing up has been good, weird for some people that:
1. My Dad does have a Jamaican accent as Patois (Patwa)
2. My Mum DOESN’T have a Ghanaian accent (as she was raised in the UK from the age of 7yrs)

My Grandparents are my biggest influencers of our Ga culture (in Granddad’s words Ga’s are superior! #ThatIsAll. BB face, with hand across the eyes) in terms of traditions and history, but for some strange reason I was never taught how to speak Ga. Our (my sister and I) efforts seems to be learning rhyming cockney slang (I was brought up in Stepney Green, not far from where the Kray twins were). My mother speaks Ga, as do the rest of the family members and my sis and I just stand there like Emmanuel from Forty Towers.

I didn’t think anything of it then but NOW I find it the BIGGEST hindrance to a complete holistic learning of my Ga history and as an African who is learning about my Nubian history. I sometimes get my younger cousins to translate for me (if they are nearby)
But God willing, and by force I will learn!

Although I don’t speak Ga, I love all aspects of Ga traditions, naming ceremonies, engagements etc and the food. I stand as a very proud African (as I am of mixed heritage), so much so that my sis and I developed http://www.lovelynotebooks.co.uk
which shows our appreciation to African influences of rich colours and styles.

Kukueley

Lovely Notebooks
http://www.lovelynotebooks.co.uk
Lovely Notebooks is the new and exclusive luxury range of paper notebooks which have been designed and handcrafted

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“As a child, an assumption would always follow me regarding my origins; many would assume that I was Caribbean. I seemed to blend in with those children who were referred to as Black British; the descendants of those who had come to Britain on ships such as The Empire Windrush. To my young mind, blacks were either African or Jamaican, and the latter definitely seemed to be the “cooler” option.
It’s funny how time changes attitudes. My mentality today is the antithesis of yesterday. Today I’m quick to correct people when they assume that I’m Caribbean; quick to boast of my Ghanaian heritage. I’m so proud of my homeland; proud of Ghana’s rich cultural heritage, proud of Ghana as Africa’s shining example of democracy, proud of Ghana’s reputation for its warm spirited people. I was born and raised in Britain, but Ghana will always remain home. I’m not British and, despite my love for the country, I’m definitely not Jamaican: I’m Ghanaian; and proud of it.”

Alex Tettey Aplerku

My name is Nii Anyetei. I am referred to with a combination of my first and middle names and initials Seth, Setto, SA, Gbontwi, GA, Nii-Nii and just simply Anyetei I wasn’t born in the UK but I was raised here (Hackney, north east London to exact) by my parents, both Ga and both from La, Accra.

I seem to meet and know a lot of Ga people these days but growing up I only knew few couple Ga families so I felt like we were a minority(amongst Ghanaians) within a minority (amongst Africans in London). In addition to my parents I was raised by my maternal great-grandmother who spoke and understood no English so my siblings and I had to speak and understand Ga. Furthermore she (Atei we called her) liked her Ga bible read to her so I learned how to read then write Ga a little. Still with that I would rate my proficiency with Ga at only 60% so I have plenty to improve and plan to get myself to 100% by associating with groups like GDRHF and time spent in Ghana.

Meanwhile as an African history aficionado I seek out books on Ga history, Ga music and there’s even a few Ga poems out there too which all help. The more I learn about my people the more proud it makes to me feel to be part of a small but significant African tribe rich in history, culture and traditions.

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Hi, I’m Juliana, but you can call me Seyi.

Although, I was born in Ibadan, Nigeria and grew in in a Yoruba household, I was raised in the UK from the age of 1 and I had never fully explored my African history until a holiday to Accra in 2011. I was amazed about how welcomed I was made to feel in other people homes, and how unlike Ghana is, from many of the stereotypes – living in the UK it’s all too easy to believe the bad press, if you are not careful. Of course the Accra sun, beaches and the clubs are great too.

So I guess I can say, that that trip to Ghana inspired me to further explore my Nigerian history and from then on my Yoruba/Ga story has accelerated and I visited Lagos for the first time last year and I had an fantastic time.

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4 responses »

  1. HALO TO MY DEAR LOVELY AND PRETTY KINGS AND QUEENS OF SONS OF GADANGBE’S, I ADJEI LARYEA FROM TESHIE, I’M VERY GLAD THAT YOU SET UP A FOUNDATION THAT WE THE GADANGBE’S, WHOM GHANAIANS LOOK OVER UPON IN MATTERS ARE GOING TO RAISE UP THEIR HEADS UP AGAIN, WE ARE FIGHTING NOT INDEPENDENCE FROM SLAVERY BUT FOR INDEPENDENCE TO HAVE OUR VOICE HEAD AND BE RESPECT AS WE WERE BEFORE INDEPENDENCE. PUT OUR GREAT CULTURE BACK TO WERE IT BELONGS, AND LEAVE AS GADANGBES AND STOP THE PRESSURE FROM MAJORITY TRIBES AND FOREIGN ATTITUDE FROM TAKING AWAY OUR CULTURE AND LIVES AWAY. THANKS TO ALL WHO MADE THESE HAPPENED AND STILL WORKING TO MAKE IT MUCH BETTER WE ARE GRATEFUL AS GADANGBES AND SUPPORTING YOU TO CONTINUE THE ONLY GOOD MOVE FROM SONS OF GADANGBES IS THESE.

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